Einstein’s Mozart: Two Geniuses

MUSIC BY W. A. MOZART  ***  TEXT BY KATE LIGHT


Celebrate Mozart’s 250th birthday and Einstein’s Miracle Year with Einstein’s Mozart!

Poet Kate Light, author of Oceanophony, The Laws of Falling Bodies, and Open Slowly, hits the stage once again with her new piece Einstein’s Mozart: Two Geniuses. Commissioned and premiered by the Colorado Chamber Players in 2006, Einstein’s Mozart commemorates this year’s historic close convergence of the centenary of Albert Einstein’s Miracle Year (1905-2005) and W. A. Mozart’s 250th birthday (1756-2006), with Light’s original text and Mozart’s chamber music.

Trace Einstein’s five papers of 1905, including the theory of special relativity, in rhymed dactyls! Follow Mozart the child prodigy as he travels Europe from age six! Float through space with Pythagoras’ music of the spheres -- and enjoy the chamber music that inspired Einstein all his life. Contact Kate Light to arrange a performance or for more information.

 

SYNOPSIS

(Text copyright 2006 Kate Light )

EINSTEIN'S MOZART: TWO GENIUSES

Part 1: MOSTLY EINSTEIN (1879-1955)

Intermission

Part 2: EINSTEIN AND MOZART (1756-1791)

Einsteins Mozart: Two Geniuses integrates two of Mozarts great string works with Kate Light’s original poetry and prose. The narration draws listeners into ordinary and extraordinary moments of these two exceptional men, while the music -- separating the texts into discrete segments -- casts its own magic.

In poems such as “The Friends Which Could Not Be Lost,” “Time and Tempo,” and “A Remarkable Year: 1905,” Ms. Light’s text delivers facts with humor and poignancy. Einstein’s Mozart begins with Einstein at the end of his long life as he looks back -- as he so often did -- in gratitude to great men “of the past...as well as the insights which they had achieved,” calling these “the friends which could not be lost.”

Part 1,  Mostly Einstein, comprises a poetic recasting of Einstein’s early creative life and times and his scientific insights, including the five papers of his Miracle Year (1905), interwoven with a performance of Mozart’s String Quintet in Eb Major, K. 614 (1791).

Part 2, Einstein and Mozart, introduces Pythagoras’ concept of the “music of the spheres,” Einstein the philosopher, and Mozart as both young prodigy and maturing artist, interwoven with Mozart’s String Quartet in C Major, K. 465 (“The Dissonant”, 1785).

At the end of this journey with the “the friends which could not be lost,” the circle closes as Mozart dreams forward to his listeners of the future.

 

Please note: Abridged versions are available for younger audiences.

 

 

EINSTEIN’S MOZART  FAQS:

 

Why Einstein’s Mozart? Why link these men together this way?

What does my group, series, or festival need to produce this work? Is it complicated to arrange?
What music by Mozart is involved?
Could other string chamber repertoire be performed?
How soon can I schedule this work?
How long is the piece?
What is the format of the piece?
Are there any supplemental materials available for the piece?
What is the intended audience for the piece?
Can the piece be done for young people or young children?
Are educational materials available?
What is the cost?
What about the narrator?

 

About Kate Light, Author

 


Why Einstein’s Mozart? Why link these men together this way?

The lives and creative spirits of these two men have much in common, with their “outsider” qualities and the extraordinary ways in which they worked. Their uneasy relationships with fame, incapacities in early years to get or keep jobs, the need to rebel, to speak their minds and above all to tap into the wells of creativity beyond their times and to leave us with something beautiful and miraculously human--all these similarities combine to make them a dynamic pair.  Each had two sons and one sister and married against their family’s wishes; and despite their unique and extraordinary takes on “family”, in a way each was, quite deeply, the product of his own.

But it is Einstein’s love of Mozart’s music, and the inspiration that it provided him, that is the strongest link of all. Said Einstein, who played the violin from the age of six, “Mozart is the greatest composer of all. Beethoven ‘created’ his music, but the music of Mozart is of such purity and beauty that one feels he merely ‘found’ it-- that it has always existed as part of the inner beauty of the universe waiting to be revealed.”
[back to questions]

What does my group, series, or festival need to produce this work? Is it complicated to arrange?
Performing Einstein's Mozart couldn’t be simpler. Other than the chamber musicians, all that is needed is the narrator (preferably Kate Light!) and a microphone. Your performance is ready to go! [back to questions]

What music by Mozart is involved?
Einstein's Mozart: Two Geniuses was originally performed with the String Quintet in Eb Major, K. 614, and String Quartet in C Major, K. 465 (the
Dissonant”), and these pieces are very effective. [back to questions]

Could other string chamber repertoire be performed?
Absolutely. Other string chamber music repertoire could be substituted for these two pieces. [back to questions]

How soon can I schedule this work?
Schedule it as soon as you would like. If you already have Mozart programmed in your season, Einstein's Mozart can expand your  musical performance into a multi-media event. [back to questions]

How long is the piece?
Einstein’s Mozart,
when performed with the String Quintet in Eb Major and String Quartet in C Major (the “Dissonant”), is just under two hours, including intermission. [back to questions]

What is the format of the piece?
The piece alternates text with movements of the music. The titles appear in the program, listed between movements, as they occur. [back to questions]

Are there any supplemental materials available for the piece?
Yes. Kate Light has compiled “top ten” quotes each, from Einstein and from Mozart, which give a taste of their personalities and senses of humor. At some performances, posters of the quotes have been exhibited in the lobby. A page elucidating the many commonalities between the two is also available. [back to questions]

What is the intended audience for the piece?
The piece is generally for audiences of all ages. Those who are curious about the nature of creativity, or who are fans or science or classical music, will find much to interest them in the piece. However, the full-length piece is not necessarily intended for very young children. The abbreviated versions for schools would be more suitable for children under eight. [back to questions]

Can the piece be done for young people or young children?
Several abridged versions of the piece are available for K through high school. These are between 45 minutes and one hour in length. We strongly encourage choosing a version which leaves time for Q & A in your school’s timeslot.  [back to questions]

Are educational materials available?
Yes. We have compiled a vocabulary list, a list of things in common to the two men, and quotes from each. We can recommend some books about Einstein and Mozart written for young readers. There are also wonderful materials such as timelines available on line through the PBS Nova and the American Museum of Natural History exhibit websites.
Though Einstein’s Mozart stands on its own, schools and teachers might consider preparing the students by listening to recordings of the chamber music in advance and reading and learning about Einstein and Mozart. [back to questions]

What is the cost?
The fees to put on the work are negotiable based on various factors, taking into account your budget, size of venue and number of performances. School discounts are available. [back to questions]


What about the narrator?
We encourage engaging Ms. Light as narrator. Ms. Light is renowned for her lively and accessible readings and her performances of her own work and that of others. She appears internationally and is also in demand as a teacher. 

If you’re engaging Kate Light to narrate on your concert series or at your festival, take fullest advantage of her presence by adding a pre- or post-performance talk and/or Q & A. Or seize the opportunity for other events with Kate Light such as another poetry reading, media interview or broadcast, or school visit or performance. [back to questions]

There’s still time to celebrate both the centenary of Albert Einstein's Miracle Year (1905-2005) and W. A. Mozart's 250th birthday (1756-2006) with Einstein’s Mozart in 2006!

To take fullest advantage of author Kate Light’s appearance with your chamber group or visit to your community, school, or festival, please consider scheduling a pre- or post-performance talk or Q & A, media interview or other event, school or festival visit or talk, public poetry reading or workshop!

ABOUT KATE LIGHT, AUTHOR

Poet Kate Light is the author of The Laws of Falling Bodies (winner of the 1997 Nicholas Roerich Prize from Story Line Press) Open Slowly (Zoo Press, 2003), and the forthcoming Gravity’s Dream: New Poems and Sonnets (West Chester University Press, Donald Justice Award, June 2006). The 2003 work Oceanophony, with music by Bruce Adolphe, is available on PollyRhythm Records. Her poetry has appeared in The Paris Review, Hudson Review, Washington Post Book World, Feminist Studies, Wisconsin Review, Dark Horse, Barrow Street, Carolina Quarterly, Western Humanities Review, Rattapallax, The Formalist, and many other journals, and in the anthologies The Penguin Book of the Sonnet, American Poetry: The Next Generation, Western Wind, and Poetry Daily: 366 Poems from the World's Most Popular Poetry Website. She has been featured several times on Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac, and composed lyrics for Disney’s Mulan II. She has taught at Hunter College and was Visiting Professor at Cornell University and at Musashino Art University in Tokyo in 2004. Renowned for her lively readings, her current and recent engagements include the 2006 Interlochen Arts Academy Literary Symposium, DC International Poetry Festival, Spoleto Festival USA, Cal State LA, and a return visit to teach at the Musashino Art University. As narrator of Oceanophony, she has appeared with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and with Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. She is also a professional violinist in New York City.  [back to questions]


Visit
http://openslowly.home.mindspring.com for more information about Einstein’s Mozart, 
and about Kate Light’s poetry, readings, and books.